Archive for December, 2015

Walking through Darkness to the Light

December 23, 2015

The following is a reprint of an e-votion I wrote several years ago.

The people who walked in darkness have seen a great light; those who lived in a land of great darkness—on them light has shined.                                                                Isaiah 9:2

 

At it’s best, the holiday season can be a happy time, a joyful time, a time of wonder and magic. Christmas is a time of celebration, a time when we remember the birth of the Christ child and how his presence changed the world forever. Christmas is also a time for giving to others, to the special people in our lives; we buy presents and bake cookies and generally do things for other people to honor them and show our love for them. It’s a great time to go caroling with friends, to visit people we haven’t seen for awhile, to go to parties and gatherings, and in general have a merry old time.

But for some people the holidays are not so merry. For some people the holidays are a reminder of what they’ve lost:   a loved one, a friend, a spouse. The tragedy of loss may have happened long ago, or it may be recent—I think of the families of the hikers who are lost on Mt. Hood—but the pain the same. For some people the financial stress of gift giving sucks the fun right out of the season. Everywhere they look they are encouraged to buy, buy, buy! and they end up doing so—even if they can’t afford it. And there are other people who don’t know why Christmas is celebrated, but only know the Santa part, who are missing out on the real source of joy that we as Christians feel. For these people and many others, the holidays may seem like a dark time, a time of sadness and stress rather than happiness and joy.

We all walk in darkness from time to time; but somehow if we’re walking in darkness at this time of the year, when it seems like all of the people around us are ridiculously happy and merry, it can be even tougher. It’s no wonder that suicide rates rise at this time of year, that domestic violence rates go up, that alcoholism and drug abuse rates rise. But there is hope. Hope is the reason that people find joy in the Christmas season—hope for the future, for our future and the future of all who suffer—hope that came to us in the form of the baby Jesus and who lives in each of us even now, 2000 years later. For those who are suffering or lonely, Christ teaches us to pray for them and visit them, to give of ourselves to them. If we are the sad ones, we may find that visiting others who need us will bring the hope and joy to our hearts that we’re missing. And if people are walking in darkness because they haven’t heard the Christmas story, Christ sends us out to them to tell the story of our experience with the good news of Jesus Christ—so that they too may have the hope and joy that comes through him.

If you are lonely or suffering and in need of prayer and fellowship, I encourage you go to a Christmas Eve service. Or visit a neighbor. Or call someone. Or write to me and I’ll pray for you. Let’s light up Christmas by giving of ourselves and giving Christ to others.

God of miracles, I look to your love at this time to bring the joy and love to my heart, and to give me hope for the future. Help me to share this hope and joy with others so that they may move out of the darkness and into the light. Amen.  

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Advent: Season of Hope, Peace, and Joy

December 15, 2015

hope peace joyWe are well into the season of Advent– only one Sunday between us and the special event we wait for. Advent, in the church world, is a season of waiting and watching for Christ to come in his many forms. We watch for the baby in the manger, we watch for the Christ who will come again. We look behind to the prophets of old who foretold the birth of the Messiah, and we look ahead to the life, death, and ministry of Jesus.

For the first Sunday of Advent we celebrate Hope. Hope is an expectation and desire that something will happen. It is the thing that keeps us going; hope makes us stand up and raise our heads. As Andy Dufresne wrote to Red in The Shawshank Redemption“hope is a good thing, maybe the best of things, and no good thing ever dies.”

The Psalmist writes, “Our hope is in the Lord, who made heaven and earth.” We hope in the one who created the universe out of nothing, who made the sky and seas, the earth and all that is in it. Our Advent hope is for the one who is and was and is to come– the Messiah, the deliverer, who will heal our brokenness with compassion and grace. This year’s gospel passage for this Sunday features John the Baptizer, pointing the way to Jesus the Christ, and the hope that comes with him.

For the second Sunday of Advent we celebrate Peace.  Peace can be understood as a time of quiet and tranquility, free from disturbance. It is a time without war, without strife, a time of harmony between social groups. In this year’s gospel for this Sunday John calls us to live peacefully with each other– not in so many words, but through actions: be kind and share what you have with anyone who has less; don’t cheat anyone; and don’t steal from others but be satisfied with what is yours.

In these times of seemingly endless war and conflict it is especially important that we look to Jesus the Christ as the Prince of Peace, and that we follow his way in seeking that peace. The ministry of Jesus was one of healing, of comforting, of loving– especially to the poor, the oppressed, those who had demons or other illnesses. Jesus opened the eyes of the blind and awakened the people around him to their own self-worth, bringing peace to their lives– and ours.

The third Sunday of Advent is Joy Sunday. Joy is a state of pleasure, delight or happiness– though being joyful doesn’t mean being happy all the time! To me, joy is more of a state of being, rather than an emotion. Joy can be fleeting, as when you receive a piece of good news; or can be longer lasting, as when you have an encounter with God or the Spirit. These mountaintop experiences can bring us a joy that stays with us always.

We see joy in this year’s gospel passage for this Sunday, which is the song of Mary. Mary sings of a God who will bring down the powerful and lift up the lowly. This is good news and a cause for joy for anyone who suffers at the hand of oppression!

Hope, peace, and joy all abound during the Advent season. Hope for a special Christmas with family and friends, peace on Christmas Eve when the children are asleep and the presents are wrapped, joy in the knowledge that this season is about the giving of ourselves to others.

These are all wonderful parts of Advent, but this coming week is the best of all– a more excellent way. I can’t wait!