A Walk to Remember

32They said to each other, “Were not our hearts burning within us while he was talking to us on the road, while he was opening the scriptures to us?” 33That same hour they got up and returned to Jerusalem; and they found the eleven and their companions gathered together. 34They were saying, “The Lord has risen indeed, and he has appeared to Simon!” 35Then they told what had happened on the road, and how he had been made known to them in the breaking of the bread. 

DSCN3537 A walk can be good for the soul. A walk in the woods especially. When I am feeling overwhelmed or overstimulated by life and all that I have going on, I head for a wooded trail and walk awhile, which I find clears my head and reenergizes me. One of my new favorite trails is at Doe Run Lake park near Covington and Independence KY, which travels the perimeter of the lake. It isn’t “wilderness” like the Great Smoky Mountains national park is, but it is the next best thing. Just enough up and down to feel I’ve had some exercise, just enough quiet to quiet my mind.

The walk to Emmaus might have had a similar effect on Cleopas and the other disciple. It was the day that they had discovered the reality of Jesus’ body being missing from the tomb, and with everything going on it must have seemed like a good idea to hit the road. Maybe they were going home. Maybe they were going to share the news with other disciples who weren’t in Jerusalem. Maybe they just needed to clear their minds, find a way to recharge their spirits after all that had happened.Whatever the reason, there they were, on the road to Emmaus.

As they walk a stranger approaches and asks what they are talking about. They sadly tell the tale: their leader and teacher, Jesus, had been put to death three days earlier; they had hoped he would be the one to redeem Israel, but it seemed that that was not to be. And now they had heard he had risen from death and they were just not sure what to make of this story.

While they were walking they didn’t expect to see Jesus. They didn’t know him when they did see him, at least not at first. But they opened up to this sympathetic stranger about all that had happened, sharing their sorrow and confusion with him. Then grief turns to joy as they break bread with Jesus and realize it had been him all along. in their joy they rush back to Jerusalem, their steps more sure, their mood not somber, but excited. It was a walk to remember, full of joy, astonishment, excitement and hope. Hope for a new future, hope that their dreams weren’t dead because Jesus wasn’t dead, but alive.

In times of discouragement, disappointment and grief we might not expect to see Jesus either. And yet, if we pay attention, we might see him anyway– in the face of a stranger who asks if we’re ok; in the face of a loved one who hugs us and lets us cry without trying to fix us; in the quiet solitude of a wooded trail where we can speak quietly or loudly with God, sharing our sorrow as the psalmists so often did. We feel his love, we feel his comfort. We know we’re not alone and we realize that hope and joy await us in our grief process. We see that new life is possible.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: