Religious or Political?

I am chagrined to realize I haven’t posted on this blog for quite awhile– since October, in fact. Between then and now quite a bit has happened– not only Advent and Christmas, but also the Presidential election and inauguration and the aftereffects of this transition.

I mostly avoid directly commenting about politics on this blog in the spirit of keeping religion and state seperate (though I have been accused of “spewing liberal lies” in my sermons– you can read them and judge for yourself here). However, I happened upon an article today about Charleston SC public schools which opened by pointing how difficult it is to completely separate politics from other aspects of our lives (in that case, public education.) The same thing is true, I think, about politics and religion; in fact it was theologian Karl Barth who was widely credited with saying preachers should write their sermons with the “Bible in one hand and the newspaper in the other.”

For tax purposes, preachers are forbidden from publicly and from the pulpit endorsing candidates for public office. I think this is a good rule and one that I follow. We aren’t forbidden as far as I know, however, from pointing out when the policies of our elected officials are dangerous or damaging to the country or its citizens. When that happens it becomes an issue of justice as much as politics, and justice issues are a preacher’s bread and butter (so to speak.) This is where Barth’s quote comes in.

You see, preaching about Biblical issues without talking about current events leads to sermons that are quite hollow. Yes, it is good for congregation members to hear that they are loved by God and live under grace and forgiveness; but there comes a moment when we have to ask what that means. Preaching salvation only seems dangerous to me because it can lead to a very self-satisfied, self-centered faith, a faith that in the comfort of our own safety forgets about the injustices all around us– injustices such as racial inequality, homelessness, and poverty. These are very kinds of things that the prophets speak against in the Old Testament and Jesus challenges in the New Testament.

Take, for example, this week’s lectionary passage from Leviticus, a book not only of the Old Testament but part of the Torah (the first five books of Jewish scripture.) Leviticus 19:9-10 says 9When you reap the harvest of your land, you shall not reap to the very edges of your field, or gather the gleanings of your harvest. 10You shall not strip your vineyard bare, or gather the fallen grapes of your vineyard; you shall leave them for the poor and the alien: I am the Lord your God. In these verses God speaks directly to the problems of hunger and poverty by instructing the people to leave grain and grapes on the edges of the field and on the ground so that the needy can come behind them and gather what they need to eat. It is a way of making sure that they are provided for– a method not too different than our SNAP program here in the United States. SNAP is the program that used to be known as “food stamps”– an allowance for the poor and needy that can be used for food and necessities. SNAP is paid for by our taxes, and I’m glad to offer this support because I have no farmland for the poor to use for gleaning as most of us do not; in this way the poor can “glean” from my tax dollars.

Another example of resistance to injustice is found in the Beatitudes of Jesus, where we read “blessed are the meek, for they will inherit the earth. Blessed are the poor, blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, blessed are the poor in spirit. In Jesus’ world it isn’t the powerful who will receive blessings but the powerless– and if that’s not a political statement, I don’t know what is! In the kingdom of God injustice will be ended, and the poor, the meek, the hungry, all of those who face oppression and injustice today will be satisfied. The single mom who has to choose between paying the rent and feeding her child will be lifted up out of her suffering; the homeless man will have a safe, warm and dry place to live.

As a preacher of the word of God I cannot ignore these teachings; neither can I not pass them on to my congregation. God loves us, yes! But as the people of God we have a responsibility to care for the ones in our midst who cannot care for themselves. Is that Biblical? Yes. But it’s also political.

 

 

 

 

 

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