Abraham, Week 2: Home

Our discussion this week truly begins our study of the book, Abraham: A Story of Three Faiths. If you’re following along in the reading, the chapter we discussed on Wednesday, May 23 was called Home. In this chapter Mr. Feiler lays the groundwork for his investigation of Abraham, beginning with a visit to Jerusalem.
We began this week by reading Genesis 12:1-9 (New Revised Standard Version (NRSV))

The Call of Abram
12 Now the Lord said to Abram, “Go from your country and your kindred and your father’s house to the land that I will show you. 2 I will make of you a great nation, and I will bless you, and make your name great, so that you will be a blessing. 3 I will bless those who bless you, and the one who curses you I will curse; and in you all the families of the earth shall be blessed.”4 So Abram went, as the Lord had told him; and Lot went with him. Abram was seventy-five years old when he departed from Haran. 5 Abram took his wife Sarai and his brother’s son Lot, and all the possessions that they had gathered, and the persons whom they had acquired in Haran; and they set forth to go to the land of Canaan. When they had come to the land of Canaan, 6 Abram passed through the land to the place at Shechem, to the oak of Moreh. At that time the Canaanites were in the land. 7 Then the Lord appeared to Abram, and said, “To your offspring I will give this land.” So he built there an altar to the Lord, who had appeared to him. 8 From there he moved on to the hill country on the east of Bethel, and pitched his tent, with Bethel on the west and Ai on the east; and there he built an altar to the Lord and invoked the name of the Lord. 9 And Abram journeyed on by stages toward the Negeb.

For background I put together a set of images showing various maps of Abraham’s journey as well as some modern day pictures of Ur, Haran, Shechem, Bethel, Ai and the Negev– locations given in the scripture passage of where Abraham had traveled. At the end are a set of pictures of Jerusalem, and it is easy to see how close in proximity are landmarks of the three faiths. In one image is the Dome of the Rock, a building with a golden dome, which marks the spot that each faith sees as a touchstone– the place where Mohammad was taken into heaven by Allah, the place where Jesus preached, the place where Isaac was offered by Abraham as sacrifice.

Jerusalem is a good place to begin to understand what it means to be monotheistic; understanding monotheism can help us understand the roots of the difficulty of coexistence that the three faiths have.

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church defines monotheism as belief in one personal and transcendent God. In simple terms, Muslims believe Allah is the one God; Christians believe God as expressed as Creator/Christ/Spirit is the one God; Jews believe that Yahweh is the one God. For each of these groups even acknowledging that the others have a god of their own is to acknowledge that there is more than one God. Thus, it becomes important to maintain an exclusivity or purity of belief in their particular deity. Over time each faith tradition has attempted to impose its own religious beliefs and practices on the others– which continues until today.

Below are some notes I pulled out of Mr. Feiler’s book, on which we centered our discussion:

Notes from Abraham: A Journey to the Heart of Three Faiths (B. Feiler): Home
A piece of land emerged out of the water [of creation]. That land is the Rock, and the rock is here.
Adam was buried here, Solomon built here, Jesus prayed here. Muhammad ascended here.
Abraham came here to bury his son.
The Rock is considered the navel of the world
Stand here, you can see eternity. Stand here, you can touch the source.
o Stand here, you can smell burning flesh.
Any panorama, any camera angle, any genuflection that encompasses one will necessarily include at least one of the others.
Jewish boy, Joshua’s, comment (re: waiting for the messiah to come and make all things new, but unable to imagine it happening with Muslims present.)

Abraham
Shared ancestor of Judaism, Christianity and Islam
History’s first monotheist
Found in Hebrew Bible, New Testament, Koran—which often disagree about Abraham’s history, even on basic matters
Even Abraham’s itinerary changed between generations and religions
]for we who study Abraham in this book, we are looking at] 3 religions, 4 millennia, one never-ending war.

Abraham’s offering of Isaac is a shared story, a shared touchstone for the three faiths.
Christianity—we read at Lent/ Easter– Isaac/ Jesus as ‘sacrifice’
Judaism—Rosh Hashannah
Islam—‘Id al-Adha—“the feast of the sacrifice” -climax of the pilgrimage
But can’t agree on what son was victim
Is that the model of holiness, the legacy of Abraham: to be prepared to kill for God?

Story from David Willna —the point of the story is that this degree of brotherly love is necessary before God can be manifest in the world.
“This (Jerusalem) is not only the spot where it is possible to connect with God, it’s the spot where you can connect with God only if you understand what it means to connect with one another” (David Willna)
“The relationship between a person and another human being is what creates and allows for a relationship with God. If you’re not capable of living with each other and getting along with each other, then you’re not capable of having a relationship with God.” (David Willna)

As we begin this study we see that there is a connection between these three faiths through the ancestor Abraham, but that each wants to claim the God of Abraham as its own one true God. Is the connection enough to say that we share one God through Abraham?

Please leave any comments or discussions in the comment section below.
For next week we’ll read the next chapter, Birth, and begin to seek out the ancestor we call Abraham.

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One Response to “Abraham, Week 2: Home”

  1. Janet Stadtmiller Says:

    Thank you Sharon…

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